Hart Visits Nogales to Reaffirm UA's Support of Rural, Border Communities and Partnerships

Speaking about the UA's commitment to rural and border communities, UA President Ann Weaver Hart said the University is "working for the next generation." (Photo Courtesy: UANews)
Speaking about the UA's commitment to rural and border communities, UA President Ann Weaver Hart said the University is "working for the next generation." (Photo Courtesy: UANews)

As part of statewide visits, University of Arizona President Ann Weaver Hart toured the U.S.-Mexico border region of Santa Cruz County, affirming the UA’s commitment to Arizona as the state’s land-grant university.

Hart's daylong visit included meetings and interaction with community college transfer students, families, extension specialists, agriculturalists and education board members.

The trip coincided with the 100-year anniversary of the UA's Cooperative Extension, established in 1914 and responsible for translating research into community solutions and economic impact, helping to shape the Arizona of today.

Cooperative Extension, a program of the UA College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, has helped grow Arizona's agriculture to a $16.2 billion industry. In 2013 alone, Cooperative Extension served more than 585,000 Arizonans.

During the fall of 2013, Hart made a similar visit to Prescott, Arizona, to meet with alumni, college officials, industry leaders and elected officials. While there, Hart worked to determine ways to expand and launch partnerships in northern Arizona to expand educational opportunities and help drive economic development.

While in Nogales, Hart emphasized the historic tenets of the land-grant mission and its more contemporary charge to teach, research and partner with communities in ways that have local economic and social impacts while working in ways that have global relevance for current and future benefits.

"It is the work and service of Cooperative Extension that actively contributes to people being able to be more productive, to get jobs and pay taxes and to support the economy," she said. "That leads to a spiral up."

Hart explained that the UA, driven by its land-grant mission, works at the community level and the national level, initiating and partnering on varied activities of tremendous importance. Among other things, the UA has a long-standing connection to the border region, maintaining several study abroad programs in Mexico and dozens of Mexico-related sponsored research projects. The University supports the growth of the community garden movement, informs families about proper nutrition, involves youth in outdoor physical activity, helps to protect food crops, informs public policy on topics related to education and industry, and expands educational access and opportunities.

Read the rest of this May 2014 UANews article at the link below.

Date released: 
Jun 4 2014