Professional Training Modules & Turf


All professional-level classes build on the instruction offered in Smartscape: A Training Program for Landscape Professionals™ by expanding the subject matter to provide a broader and/or deeper knowledge in given areas of interest.  They are designed to address issues pertinent to landscape water conservation and education efforts unique to Tucson's urban Sonoran Desert community and the surrounding areas in which the program participants live and work.

TURF IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT IS A SINGLE HALF-DAY WORKSHOP

ALL OTHERS ARE 3-PART MODULES (UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED)

SEATING IS LIMITED. 

Please click on a class, below, then click "read more" at the bottom and you will see more information, plus a REGISTER button on the page.

 

Apr 1 Wed
Pro Training Module – Irrigation Design, Maintenance and Management – Mar. 25, Apr. 1, Apr. 8 @ UA/Pima County Cooperative Extension
3:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Categories: Additional (Professional)

This 3-part module focuses on practical irrigation information for everyday field applications. Learn basic design concepts, maintenance and management, from the valve to the sprinkler. Hands-on practical experiences to demonstrate skills and techniques taught during lecture. Pre-requisite: Certificate of Completion from Smartscape: A Training Program for Landscape Professionals™ or SmartScape Espanol.  Registration is limited to 15.

Design: March 25th

Maintenance: April 1st

Management: April 8th

Time:

    3:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Location:

    University of Arizona/Pima County Cooperative Extension

4210 N. Campbell Avenue (E. side of Campbell between Roger & River, across from Trader Joe’s)

Apr 4 Sat
Pro Training Module – Creating and Maintaining Healthy Landscapes – Apr. 4, Apr. 18 & May 2 @ UA Pima County Cooperative Extension
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Categories: Additional (Professional)

Understanding environmental factors, soil conditions and local pests and diseases will help us become better stewards of the landscape.  The objective of this series is to provide participants an opportunity to learn what it takes to develop healthy landscapes and to develop a plan of action for the landscapes in their care.

Each class consists of both classroom and field activities. Come prepared to make practical applications of the ideas and information presented.

Class #1 Understanding Your Site and Your Soil

  • Understanding your site, identifying microclimates.
  • Soil – the backbone of the landscape and garden.  This is where it all begins and topics include:
    • The soil food web.
    • Types of soil – why does it matter?
    • How to determine what type of soil you have.
    • What is special about Tucson dirt?
    • What do plants need from the soil?
    • What can you expect to learn from testing your soil?
    • Mulch, compost and what the monsoon can do for you.

Class #2 Cultural Practices for a Healthy Landscape

We can save time, trouble, water and money by choosing appropriate plants for the soil and exposure we are working with.  This class will focus on how to identify the plants that suit your site and your interests, as well as planting and maintenance practices that keep plants and soil healthy:  This class focuses on:

  • Choosing plants for soil, exposure, and other factors of a microclimate.
  • Hydrozoning.
  • Planting basics that help you reduce diseases and pests. Concepts include:
    • Cover crops and rotation for homeowners.
    • What does a plant family have to do with it?
    • Fertilizing, pruning, and watering practices.

Class #3 What To Do When Pests and Diseases Happen

What are your safest options when pests and disease happen?  We are becoming more aware of the impact of insecticides, herbicides and other chemicals that have been commonly used to control diseases in our landscapes.  In this class we will focus on methods of intervention that help preserve our health, the health of the soil, and the beneficial insects that are so valuable in the landscape.  Topics covered include:

  • What are your weeds telling you about the soil?  How you can use the weeds to determine what your soil needs.
  • Beneficial insects and how we can attract and conserve them.
  • How to determine if interventions are necessary.
  • Organic methods of intervention – how to identify your best options, optimize applications and lessen adverse affects to beneficial insects and plants in the garden.

 

 

Apr 8 Wed
Pro Training Module – Irrigation Design, Maintenance and Management – Mar. 25, Apr. 1, Apr. 8 @ UA/Pima County Cooperative Extension
3:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Categories: Additional (Professional)

This 3-part module focuses on practical irrigation information for everyday field applications. Learn basic design concepts, maintenance and management, from the valve to the sprinkler. Hands-on practical experiences to demonstrate skills and techniques taught during lecture. Pre-requisite: Certificate of Completion from Smartscape: A Training Program for Landscape Professionals™ or SmartScape Espanol.  Registration is limited to 15.

Design: March 25th

Maintenance: April 1st

Management: April 8th

Time:

    3:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Location:

    University of Arizona/Pima County Cooperative Extension

4210 N. Campbell Avenue (E. side of Campbell between Roger & River, across from Trader Joe’s)

Apr 18 Sat
Pro Training Module – Creating and Maintaining Healthy Landscapes – Apr. 4, Apr. 18 & May 2 @ UA Pima County Cooperative Extension
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Categories: Additional (Professional)

Understanding environmental factors, soil conditions and local pests and diseases will help us become better stewards of the landscape.  The objective of this series is to provide participants an opportunity to learn what it takes to develop healthy landscapes and to develop a plan of action for the landscapes in their care.

Each class consists of both classroom and field activities. Come prepared to make practical applications of the ideas and information presented.

Class #1 Understanding Your Site and Your Soil

  • Understanding your site, identifying microclimates.
  • Soil – the backbone of the landscape and garden.  This is where it all begins and topics include:
    • The soil food web.
    • Types of soil – why does it matter?
    • How to determine what type of soil you have.
    • What is special about Tucson dirt?
    • What do plants need from the soil?
    • What can you expect to learn from testing your soil?
    • Mulch, compost and what the monsoon can do for you.

Class #2 Cultural Practices for a Healthy Landscape

We can save time, trouble, water and money by choosing appropriate plants for the soil and exposure we are working with.  This class will focus on how to identify the plants that suit your site and your interests, as well as planting and maintenance practices that keep plants and soil healthy:  This class focuses on:

  • Choosing plants for soil, exposure, and other factors of a microclimate.
  • Hydrozoning.
  • Planting basics that help you reduce diseases and pests. Concepts include:
    • Cover crops and rotation for homeowners.
    • What does a plant family have to do with it?
    • Fertilizing, pruning, and watering practices.

Class #3 What To Do When Pests and Diseases Happen

What are your safest options when pests and disease happen?  We are becoming more aware of the impact of insecticides, herbicides and other chemicals that have been commonly used to control diseases in our landscapes.  In this class we will focus on methods of intervention that help preserve our health, the health of the soil, and the beneficial insects that are so valuable in the landscape.  Topics covered include:

  • What are your weeds telling you about the soil?  How you can use the weeds to determine what your soil needs.
  • Beneficial insects and how we can attract and conserve them.
  • How to determine if interventions are necessary.
  • Organic methods of intervention – how to identify your best options, optimize applications and lessen adverse affects to beneficial insects and plants in the garden.

 

 

May 2 Sat
Pro Training Module – Creating and Maintaining Healthy Landscapes – Apr. 4, Apr. 18 & May 2 @ UA Pima County Cooperative Extension
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Categories: Additional (Professional)

Understanding environmental factors, soil conditions and local pests and diseases will help us become better stewards of the landscape.  The objective of this series is to provide participants an opportunity to learn what it takes to develop healthy landscapes and to develop a plan of action for the landscapes in their care.

Each class consists of both classroom and field activities. Come prepared to make practical applications of the ideas and information presented.

Class #1 Understanding Your Site and Your Soil

  • Understanding your site, identifying microclimates.
  • Soil – the backbone of the landscape and garden.  This is where it all begins and topics include:
    • The soil food web.
    • Types of soil – why does it matter?
    • How to determine what type of soil you have.
    • What is special about Tucson dirt?
    • What do plants need from the soil?
    • What can you expect to learn from testing your soil?
    • Mulch, compost and what the monsoon can do for you.

Class #2 Cultural Practices for a Healthy Landscape

We can save time, trouble, water and money by choosing appropriate plants for the soil and exposure we are working with.  This class will focus on how to identify the plants that suit your site and your interests, as well as planting and maintenance practices that keep plants and soil healthy:  This class focuses on:

  • Choosing plants for soil, exposure, and other factors of a microclimate.
  • Hydrozoning.
  • Planting basics that help you reduce diseases and pests. Concepts include:
    • Cover crops and rotation for homeowners.
    • What does a plant family have to do with it?
    • Fertilizing, pruning, and watering practices.

Class #3 What To Do When Pests and Diseases Happen

What are your safest options when pests and disease happen?  We are becoming more aware of the impact of insecticides, herbicides and other chemicals that have been commonly used to control diseases in our landscapes.  In this class we will focus on methods of intervention that help preserve our health, the health of the soil, and the beneficial insects that are so valuable in the landscape.  Topics covered include:

  • What are your weeds telling you about the soil?  How you can use the weeds to determine what your soil needs.
  • Beneficial insects and how we can attract and conserve them.
  • How to determine if interventions are necessary.
  • Organic methods of intervention – how to identify your best options, optimize applications and lessen adverse affects to beneficial insects and plants in the garden.

 

 

Participation is FREE. Seating is limited. Registration is required.